New patients

progress

We have a very busy and very large practice. There are very few Paediatricians who see children for primary care. The model in Ontario is actually for children to see family doctors and to be referred to a Paediatrician if needed ( see page       ” what is a Pediatrician anyway” ).

1- Primary care

We are not currently accepting new patients. Please check back in the future for updates.

There are times when we limit new patients due to volume of patients and time constraints. We also accept children requiring complex care that are referred by the Hospital for Sick Children or another Paediatric center.

Our primary care patients are seen for routine care and for sick appointments. Paediatricians will see children until age 18 but often a transition is made to a family doctor in the teens.

2- Consultations– we accept patients referred by family doctors for specific problems. The appointment must be booked by your family doctor and a letter will be sent back to your family doctor to keep communication open. A referral is not a way of becoming a primary care patient.

We have a good rapport with family doctors in our area. We have a team approach to care for children in the area. It is acceptable to see a family doctor for primary care and if there is a concern or need for an opinion, a referral can easily be made to a Paediatrician. If you feel your child needs to see a Paediatrician, discuss the concern with your family doctor.

Here is a sample of an appropriate referral letter:

Patient referral letter

We DO NOT accept parents who intend not to vaccinate or parents who plan to significantly delay vaccination.

New patients- what to expect

We see ill children during our ” sick parade” from 8:45 to 11 am. Hours are subject to change and the most up-to-date information can be found on our Facebook Page which is updated every Sunday. We try and see many ill children during this time but sometimes can reach capacity and close early. The “sick parade” is an appropriate time and place to bring your child for a fever, ear ache, cough/cold, etc. It is not appropriate to come in for a check up or follow up of a problem or to discuss an issue like a behavioural problem. These are best booked by appointment so we can allot the appropriate amount of time for the visit. We also try not to see infants less than 2 months of age during our walk-in time since we don’t want them exposed to other ill children.

We are not open weekends or holidays. See welcome to our clinic page

We encourage our block fee. This is a yearly fee that gives you access to communication via email, or text/chat apps that we use. Parents commonly have questions about their children that may be urgent or more routine. Resources like telehealth or “Dr. Google” are limited and confusing and often yield the wrong advice. We try to give the best advice we can within the limits of this type of encounter. Patients often email while they are vacationing somewhere, often send pictures of rashes etc. Advice may be limited but can be helpful in many cases. It is generally a good way to keep in touch and keep us informed of things involving your child. We strongly recommend paying the block fee every year.

We promote vaccines. There are vaccines paid for by our public health system. Then there are vaccines we recommend that are not paid for ( Bexsero, Menactra, Twinrix etc — see vaccine page) There are also vaccines that  are supplied late ( in grade 7 public health provides hep b and menactra) and we would suggest doing these earlier. In these cases the vaccine must be purchased.

We try to provide the best care possible for your child.

group of children's silhouettes